What to do if Nexium causes a B12 deficiency



Nexium users may have heard that heartburn drugs are apt to cause a B12 deficiency. While this may be troublesome news, there are easy steps that can increase your intake of this vital vitamin.

Nexium users may have heard that heartburn drugs are apt to cause a B12 deficiency. While this may be troublesome news, there are easy steps that can increase your intake of this vital vitamin.

What to eat
There are plenty of foods you'll actually enjoy eating that are high in B12. Some of the best options include:

  • Beef liver, sirloin and steak all contain B12, just be sure to watch the cholesterol.
  • Certain fish, such as salmon and trout, are high in B12. Plus, you'll also be upping your omega-3 intake. Even enjoying more canned light tuna can do the trick, according to the San Francisco Gate.
  • Shellfish of all types are great, but clams are the best. Other top performers include oysters, mussels and crab.
  • Both chicken and turkey breast can be broiled, grilled, roasted or poached for a healthy dose of the vitamin.
  • Vegetarians can opt for dairy products such as milk, eggs and cheese (brie is best!).

There are also a number of products available that have been fortified with vitamin B12, such as cereals and breakfast bars. Depending on your preferences, you can find enjoyable foods that will prevent Nexium from ditching your B12 absorption. Plus, you can always purchase a B12 supplement from a Canada pharmacy.

Importance of B12
Why does it matter if you aren't getting enough vitamin B12? Well, it plays a vital role in the development of the nervous system, and you may even notice cognitive decline if you aren't ingesting enough. Additionally, too little B12 may lead to other health issues such as anemia, muscle weakness, fatigue, low blood pressure, depression and more, according to The New York Times.

In fact, the source reports that Ilsa Katz was misdiagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, when she was actually suffering from a B12 deficiency.

"She couldn't remember names, where she'd been or what she'd done that say," Katz's daughter Vivian Atkins told The Times. "Initially, I was not too worried. I thought it was part of normal aging. But over time, the confusion and memory problems became more severe and more frequent."

Luckily, the clinic Katz was tested at also checked her B12 levels. When these were found to be low, they began weekly injections of the vitamin, and it's a good thing they did. It didn't take long for the 85-year-old to become less agitated and confused, as her memory began improving.

In order to prevent issues such as this, Nexium users should have their B12 levels monitored and take whatever steps their doctors recommend to keep things on track.