New postpartum depression study could affect Effexor users



Postpartum depression can be a difficult condition to diagnose, and extremely dangerous for new mothers, their children and the rest of their families.

Postpartum depression can be a difficult condition to diagnose, and a troubling issue for new mothers, their children and the rest of their families. Now, a new study revealed that researchers might be close to discovering genetic markers that would indicate whether an expectant mother is likely to develop postpartum depression, a condition sometimes treated with Effexor, at earlier stages than ever before.

TIME Magazine reported that researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine discovered alterations in several genes when studying 52 pregnant women. By isolating the genes and observing the activity regularly, researchers found certain markers that indicated a greater likelihood of postpartum depression.

What's more, the source explained that these genetic changes were not permanent, and were instead fleeting. This led the study's authors to examine why certain genes were activated irregularly during certain terms of pregnancy. Currently, the scientists believe that these changes are likely caused by shifts in the hippocampus resulting from higher levels of estrogen.

According to the news provider, this would be a major step in helping doctors diagnose postpartum depression, which some studies have shown affect 20 percent of new mothers to at least a slight degree, and some more severely.

Thus far, the study's authors believe that the two genetic markers that were isolated during the research can predict postpartum depression during later terms with as much as 85 percent accuracy.

The Mayo Clinic explains that prompt diagnosis and treatment of postpartum depression can minimize the negative side effects and allow new mothers to enjoy the company of their babies. The organizations lists several symptoms, such as feelings of shame, inability to concentrate, lack of joy and severe mood swings.

Further, the Mayo Clinic suggests women seek out medical attention immediately if these symptoms intensify or do not go away after two weeks.