New fertility research might impact those who consume Clomid



Trends in reproductive behavior have shifted dramatically throughout the past several decades, as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that roughly 20 percent of all women currently have their first child when they are above the age of 35.

Trends in reproductive behavior have shifted dramatically throughout the past several decades, as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that roughly 20 percent of all women currently have their first child when they are over the age of 35. As the having a child becomes more difficult past this age, this could be one of the reasons why infertility, a condition that some individuals use Clomid to treat, has become more widespread.

While there are a variety of factors that experts believe might cause infertility, a new study from the University of Missouri revealed that economic conditions might influence the condition more than previously believed. According to researchers from the school, economic fluctuations were found to come with the potential of having the biggest impact on fertility.

The researchers noted that the United Nations estimates the world population to balloon to 8 billion within the next 10 years, though decreasing global fertility rates might cut that number substantially. Authors of the study asserted that economic class, more widespread quality education and a refined labor market might have the biggest impacts on global fertility rates.

"Another important finding of our study was that intervention programs that made changes that really affected individuals achieved the best results," Mary Shenk, assistant professor of anthropology at MU, stated. "For example, although advertising campaigns encouraging lower fertility may reach a wider audience for less money, face-to-face intervention campaigns providing health services or access to contraception provide better results and are thus a better use of resources."

The CDC explains that some of the most common causes of infertility in women include age, smoking, stress, poor dietary choices and obesity. However, these can sometimes be combated through the use of fertility drugs such as Clomid.