Mothers not taking Effexor for their depression may pass it on to their children



Throughout pregnancy, females do a number of things to up their health for the sake of their babies. Those who are taking Effexor for their depression may be concerned of any side effects.

Throughout pregnancy, females do a number of things to up their health for the sake of their babies. Those who are taking Effexor for their depression may be concerned of any side effects. However, recent research has indicated that simply suffering from the psychological disorder while pregnant may lead to similar struggles for the child later in life.

Potential risk of depression for teens
In the past, researchers have collected data that suggested there may be a link between depression in mothers and children. In order to learn more on the topic, professionals from The University of Bristol and University College decided to conduct a cohort study. The focus was to test a hypothesis that independent factors played a role in prenatal and postnatal depression increasing the risk of feelings of sadness for offspring.

Data was collected from more than 4,500 parents and their children for investigation. Researchers examined how many of the children, now age 18, were experiencing major depression based on the International Classification of Diseases. It was uncovered that antenatal depression presented itself as an independent risk factor for depression in the children. These kids were 1.28 times more likely to have symptoms than those whose mothers were not faced with feelings of sadness while carrying.

This information is significant and promotes the need for additional research surrounding the treatment of maternal depression. Authors of the study believe that there's a chance future bouts of sadness in adolescents could be avoided if their mothers symptoms are properly treating during pregnancy. The results of this study also indicates that postpartum depression shouldn't be the only worrisome mental disorder for parents.

Moving forward and treatment
Rebecca Pearson, one of the study's researchers, explained to Reuters that depression needs to be treated during pregnancy in order to promote the mental health of children. However, this is not without caution.

"We certainly don't want to say everyone should be going on antidepressants, because we don't know the risks," Pearson told the source.

Unlike postpartum depression, which can have a negative effect on the development of young children, sadness during pregnancy affects the fetus in a different way. In these cases, the baby encounters stress hormones as they pass through the placenta. This is believed to be the reason that the children are more likely to encounter struggles with the mental disorder later in life.

Pregnant females who have been diagnosed with depression should talk to their health care professionals regarding possible treatment options, including the use of antidepressants such as Effexor.