Got a persistent cold? It could be nasal polyps



If you are experiencing what you think are cold symptoms and the over-the-counter medications you got from your Canadian pharmacy don't seem to be working, you could be suffering from nasal polyps.

If you are experiencing what you think are cold symptoms and the over-the-counter medications you got from your Canadian pharmacy don't seem to be working, you could be suffering from nasal polyps.

Although the condition sounds serious, nasal polyps are actually common, benign (noncancerous) growths that develop in the nose or sinus cavity. According to WebMD, the polyps will often appear like seedless, peeled grapes and are not painful to the touch.

What causes nasal polyps?
When the tissues inside the nose become inflamed, polyps will begin to grow in the nasal mucosa. According to Healthline, the mucosa is a very important layer of the nose because it works to protect the inside of your nose and sinuses, and also humidifies the air you breathe.

There are many things that can cause inflammation in your nasal mucosa, from allergies to sinus infections to asthma. However, there are also certain medical conditions like hay fever, cystic fibrosis, family history, Churg-Strauss syndrome and sensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen that could contribute to nasal polyps.

Why colds and nasal polyps are confused with one another
Many of the symptoms of nasal polyps, including constant stuffiness, runny nose, postnasal drip, mouth breathing, lost sense of smell, sinus pressure and congestion, are also typical side effects of a bout with a cold. This is why so many people who end up getting nasal polyps will first take Canadian drugs for a cold first.

How a doctor determines diagnoses nasal polyps
Because the symptoms are so similar, it is important to have a health care professional perform a test with an otoscope to examine the inner cavities of your nose. A doctor may also run a CT scan or MRI to see how enlarged the growth has become or to determine whether or not the polyp is cancerous. If you have never had an allergy test before, a doctor may perform one to see if there is anything that may be causing excess inflammation.

Why treatment for nasal polyps is important
Nasal polyps can lead to bleeding and infection if they are left untreated, and may require more severe measures, such as removal surgery, if they are ignored or become too enlarged, according to the National Institutes of Health. This is why it is important to see your doctor if cold symptoms last more than two weeks. You physician may prescribe Nasonex to help you with symptoms of nasal polyps and inflammation.