Effexor users: Depression may worsen effects of aging



People taking Effexor for major depression have likely experienced symptoms that affect their mental and physical processes. For some time, researchers have been looking into what exactly about the mental disorder produces these results.

People taking Effexor for major depression have likely experienced symptoms that affect their mental and physical processes. For some time, researchers have been looking into what exactly about the mental disorder produces these results. Health care professionals from the Free University in Amsterdam have uncovered new information indicating that an increase to the aging process of cells in depressed patients may be the cause.

Medical research
The researchers looked at blood samples that were taken from more than 2,400 participants to see how major depressive disorder affected cellular aging. Individuals involved in the study were aged 18 to 65. Participants fell into one of three groups equally: currently depressed, past of depression and never diagnosed with depression. The size of the telomeres, located on the ends of the chromosomes, were measured in each sampling. These small caps get smaller every time a cell divides, giving investigators a good idea at the age of each telomere.

Participants who had smaller caps at the end of their chromosomes either had suffered or were suffering from depression. Additionally, it was found that individuals with the shortest telomeres had experienced the most severe bouts of the mental disorder. Researchers pointed out that their findings were only based on major depressive issues, and milder forms may not have the same results. Therefore, further studies are required on the topic.

"The findings might help explain the variety of health complaints often experienced by people with major depression," Josin Verhoeven, author of the study, explained to LiveScience.

Additionally, authors of the study would like further investigations to find out whether or not the aging process uncovered can be reversed. According to LiveScience, there is an enzyme that is able to elongate telomeres, which could lead to positive effects. However, until more studies are done, those who are depressed should avoid lifestyle choices which may also help speed up the aging process.

Changes to daily routines, such as including regular physical activity, may help to reverse the effects of aging on the cells as caused by depression. Since the mental disorder has been linked to other health conditions like Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obesity and dementia, it's important that health care professionals obtain a better understanding as to how the disease is disrupting the body's normal function.

Individuals should talk to their doctors about antidepressants like Effexor that can help treat severe feelings of sadness and other symptoms that are associated with depression. It's important to note that there is no evidence as to whether or not these types of drugs help to prevent the advanced aging process of cells or not.