Effexor users may be at risk of memory loss due to depression



There's nothing new about memories fading as individuals age. And, over the years, research has indicated that depression may play a role in the loss of memory.

There's nothing new about memories fading as individuals age. And, over the years, research has indicated that depression may play a role in the loss of memory. However, researchers still have many questions on the subject. Recently, professionals from Brigham Young University aimed to learn more about the how this mental disorder affects declarative memory performance in patients.

Overview of the research
In order to collect data, a study was designed that would take a healthy demographic to see how patients' pattern separation performances reacted to severe depressive symptoms. This was done through memory tests and questionnaires that monitored levels of depression. The information indicated that there was a negative relationship between memory and depression - meaning that the ability to recognize patterns worsened as feelings of sadness became more intense.

"They don't have amnesia," Brock Kirwan, a psychology and neuroscience professor at BYU, explained in a statement. "They are just missing the details."

What the results mean
Poor pattern separation performance can affect people in a number of ways, mainly making them unable to remember new experiences. For instance, some individuals may struggle with remembering whether or not they've shared information regarding a personal situation with family and friends. This happens because the hippocampus - an area of the brain that is responsible for growing new memory cells - is stunted as a symptom of depression.

"Because of the way new cells are integrated, they seem to be really important in helping you in distinguishing between similar things," Kirwan told The Salt Lake Tribune.

Moving forward
However, there is some good news. Research indicates that antidepressants such as Effexor may help prevent this issue with memory problems. Additionally, authors of the study indicated that their findings come with some limits. Since none of the participants had clinical depression, they were only able to look at individuals with mild symptoms.

"We suggest that future research in this area is needed to better determine the type of relationships between psychological disorders, pattern separation, antidepressants, and neurogenesis," authors of the study wrote, according to Popular Science.

Those who are suffering from depression and experiencing issues with their memories may want to talk to health care professionals regarding the use of Effexor. This can be purchased from a Canadian online pharmacy in the privacy of one's own home. Although benefits with memorization are not guaranteed, it may help with this and other symptoms an individual is experiencing.