Depression may be linked to neuro-inflammation, could affect Effexor consumers



While a combination of prescription drugs such as Effexor and therapy is most commonly used to treat depression, researchers continue to search for other methods of minimizing the negative symptoms among patients.

While a combination of prescription drugs such as Effexor and therapy is most commonly used to treat depression, researchers continue to search for other methods of minimizing the negative symptoms among patients. Although, a new study found that severe depression can sometimes be accompanied by neuro-inflammation, this problem can be treated by progressive methods.

The Neurological Wellness Center recently published a study in the journal of Neuropsychopharmacology that linked neuro-inflammation with severe depression, and it found that this connection might also be related to the prevalence of suicidal thoughts. For this reason, the researchers believe that a treatment commonly used for patients with traumatic brain injuries might be useful for those with major depression as well.

"The presence of hypertrophic astrocytes in BA24 white matter is consistent with reports suggesting white matter alterations in depression, and provides further support to the neuroinflammatory theory of depression," Susana Torres-Platas, the study's lead author, explained. 

The treatment discussed by Torres-Platas and her team is a group of injections that work to decrease inflammation in the brain. Moreover, the associated drugs have also been found to be useful for treating pain associated with arthritis as well as a variety of inflammation-based conditions. 

Still, there are a variety of other methods to treat inflammation, including those that are holistic. For example, several studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties. If major depression does come along with severe brain inflammation, these types of alternative products could be investigated as potential treatments.

Though researchers are pushing forward on progressive treatments for depression, the stigma attached to the condition might still be intensifying in the general public. The Week recently reported that depression and anxiety were the subjects of discussion at a health summit in Washington, and some reporters believed that the conditions should not be covered under insurance and healthcare support.