Clomid users may suffer from brain circuitry issues



Many women who are taking Clomid would like answers as to why they are unable to conceive naturally. While some may have reasons which to attribute their difficulties, this is not the case for all.

Many women who are taking Clomid would like answers as to why they are unable to conceive naturally. While some may have reasons which to attribute their difficulties, this is not the case for all. This is why researchers have been working for years to figure out if brain circuitry plays a role. Recently, professionals from the University of Otago found a possible link between the two.

What the study found
The protein kisspeptin and its receptor Gpr54 have been found to have an effect on human fertility in the past. Additionally, researchers were aware that kisspeptin plays an important role in the process of ovulation. The new information collected by neuroscientist Allan Herbison and his colleagues proved that signaling for this protein takes place in a small grouping of nerve cells that are located in the brain. These are referred to as gonadotropin-release hormone neurons.

What investigators found was that mice without the Gpr54 receptors did not undergo puberty. As a result, these test subjects were infertile. Once the mice had the gene inserted, reproductive abilities changed. By simply adding this to their genetic makeup, the mice became fertile.

"Our new understanding of the exact mechanism by which kisspeptin acts as a master controller of reproduction is an exciting breakthrough which opens up avenues for tackling what is often a very heartbreaking health issue," Herbison said in statement. "Through detailing this mechanism we now have a key chemical switch to which drugs can be precisely targeted."

Issues of infertility
People across the globe are affected by infertility. This study was based in New Zealand, where researchers estimate up to 20 percent of local couples struggle with the inability to conceive naturally. Additionally, those who conducted this study believe that one-third of these instances are the result of brain circuitry disorders.

However, since this study was conducted on mice, further investigation is required on the topic. If the results are the same among a group of human participants, then it is likely scientists will be able to develop further methods for treating instances of infertility. Although Clomid is one great option that many couples experience success with, it may not do the trick for those who are dealing with a kisspeptin issue.

When struggling with fertility, women should talk to their doctors about the best course of action. Clomid and other fertility drugs may be purchased easily from an online pharmacy in the privacy of their own homes.