Clomid users can prevent fetal addiction development with healthy diet



Women using Clomid may be interested in several studies that have shown a pregnant woman's poor eating habits are likely to be passed on to her child if she snacks on junk food during the fetus' development.

Women using Clomid may be interested in several studies that have shown a pregnant woman's poor eating habits are likely to be passed on to her child if she snacks on junk food during the fetus' development.

The FASEB Journal published a study conducted by Australia's University of Adelaide that relates bad snacking habits of expecting mothers to junk food-addicted offspring.

The study began with School of Agriculture Food and Wine FOODplus Research Center scientists feeding one group of mother rats regular diets and another a mix of treats humans commonly refer to as junk food - snacks high in fat and sugar - during pregnancy and the period of lactation. After this time, injections of opioid receptor blockers, which stop dopamine secretion in the body, were administered in the pups. The study concluded that rats born to mothers who ate junk food during the time of initial development were more likely to have higher tolerance to sugary and fatty foods.

"This study shows that addiction to junk food is true addiction," FASEB Journal editor-in-chief Gerald Weissmann said.

According to Weissmann, this study, in addition to another with nearly identical controls, proves that following a healthy diet is essential for women during pregnancy in order to prevent bad eating habits in their children.