Clomid users are not at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease



Clomid users will be glad to find out that officials from the Women's College Research Institute recently found that there is not long-term cardiovascular risk for women who undergo fertility treatment.

Clomid users will be glad to find out that officials from the Women's College Research Institute recently found that there is not long-term cardiovascular risk for women who undergo fertility treatment. This was the first study done of its kind.

"The speculated association between fertility therapy and subsequent cardiovascular disease is not surprising given that more women are waiting until an older age to have children, when they are at a greater risk of developing heart disease," Dr. Jacob Udell, lead author of the study, explained in a statement.

What was found
This investigation followed 1.1 million females who gave birth with the aid of fertility drugs. Seventeen years after their pregnancies, doctors conducted follow-ups with the women. Although an increased risk for heart disease was not found, plenty of other information was uncovered.

For instance, researchers found that fertility therapy increased fivefold from 1993 to 2010. Many of the participants who used drugs like Clomid to aid in pregnancy experienced some complications during their terms, including:

  • A 30 percent increased risk for developing gestational diabetes
  • Placental disorders increased by 16 percent
  • Occurrences of preeclampsia saw an increase of 10 percent

Although researchers did not attribute it to the use of fertility therapy, women who gave birth with it were half as likely to suffer from stroke, heart attack or heart failure than females who got pregnant naturally.

"Our findings provide some reassurance that fertility therapy does not appear to increase long-term risk of cardiovascular events following successful pregnancy," Dr. Donald Redelmeier, co-author of the study, said.

Potential reasoning
Many question whether or not there is a reason behind the findings of this study if fertility drugs are not the answer. Redelmeier believes that women who are using Clomid and similar prescriptions are more likely to have made healthy lifestyle adjustments due to trouble with conception. However, it has been noted that further research is required on the topic of the impact that fertility therapy has on patients. Doctors believe they may be able to reduce the possibility for health risks once more is known about the long-term effects of these drugs.

Women who are experiencing fertility issues can talk to their doctors about using Clomid to help increase their chances for pregnancy. This and other drugs are readily available via a Canadian online pharmacy.