Another reason for Effexor users to start exercising



It's well known that exercise can help to release endorphins and make people feel good - that's why it's called a "runner's high." Although those who suffer from depression and are taking Effexor may not feel up to hitting the gym, it could have substantial benefits to their moods.

It's well known that exercise can help to release endorphins and make people feel good - that's why it's called a "runner's high." Although those who suffer from depression and are taking Effexor may not feel up to hitting the gym, it could have substantial benefits to their moods. A new investigation from the University of Toronto shows that physical activity can help to prevent depression.

The findings
Researchers conducted a systematic review of prospective studies dealing with the effectiveness of working out on depressive symptoms. The results were stunning, indicating that moderate exercise may have long-term benefits for depression prevention. Authors indicated that they were in search of advanced precautions that can be taken to avoid the mental disorder in patients who may be at-risk - and that's just what they did.

"It's definitely worth taking note that if you're currently active, you should sustain it," Dr. George Mammen, co-author of the research, said in a statement. "If you're not physically active, you should initiate the habit. This review shows promising evidence that the impact of being active goes far beyond the physical."

So, although these findings bring a preventative measure for depression, it does not prove to be a reasonable treatment option for those who are currently diagnosed. Rather, individuals should add a workout routine to their use of Effexor. In the long run, the benefits may reduce future symptoms.

The moves
Those who are looking to add physical activity to their routines to reduce risk of future depression may be wondering which type is best. According to the Mayo Clinic, pretty much anything goes. From weightlifting to running to dog-walking, exercise of all kinds can provide benefits. The point is, people need to keep themselves up and moving. On days where the gym can't be fit into a hectic schedule, it's best to commute on foot or by bike.

Most doctors will recommend that individuals maintain a schedule of 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise three to five days weekly. The more the better, but patients need to know their limits. Overdoing it may lead to injury, which can result in the inability to work out and cause one to feel blue. Again, when short on time, up the level of difficulty, making 15 minutes as good as 30. Most people find it's easiest to stay motivated when participating in a routine they enjoy or with a workout buddy.