$90 million grant directed toward cancer research



For those that may be seeking Canadian drugs to help reduce the side effects of cancer therapy, there is good news.

For those that may be seeking Canadian drugs to help reduce the side effects of cancer therapy, there is good news. A recent grant from the Daniel K. Ludwig Trust has directed $90 million into cancer research in six different institutions across the country, according to The Boston Globe.

Some of these research centers include Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the gift will be the largest ever for the former. Other places that will be receiving the donation include Stanford University, The University of Chicago, Johns Hopkins University and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

Money for biomedical research has become somewhat uncertain for doctors and scientists, so this donation is a welcome gift for many in the community and could lead to better treatments and Canada drugs for those suffering from cancer in the future.

"Many lines of research from the federal level are essentially in free fall at the moment," Robert Weinberg, director of the Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology at MIT, said in the Globe. "We can think about continuous funding over the next years, rather than eating hand-to-mouth."

According to the Globe, Ludwig acquired his wealth in oil and gas development and owned 200 companies. Neither he nor his late wife, Virginia, suffered from cancer. However, he believed that it was one of the world's most dire issues and wanted to use his fortune to do something about it.

The American Cancer Society estimated that the number of people living with cancer in the U.S. in 2012 was more than 1.6 million, and an estimated 1,500 died every day from cancer that same year, so the need for better research and treatment is very important for the health of many Americans.